Topics/Series Courses

A topics course is one that is not regularly offered at the University of Lethbridge. Departments may use topics courses to try out a new course that they are considering regularizing, or for faculty to offer courses related to their research. Series courses are a group of courses within a certain genre and the offering changes every semester.  You may take multiple topics and series courses for credit as long as each offering is distinct (i.e. having significantly different titles).

If you have any questions about topics courses, please contact the Fine Arts Advising Office (W660).

2024-2025 | Topics/Series Courses

ART

Introduction to Ceramic Art

ART 2850 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
This course will explore approaches to working with ceramic materials in a fine arts context. Basic construction methods and surface design techniques will be taught alongside discussions of contemporary theoretical approaches to working with ceramics. Special attention will be given to assisting students with strategies for incorporating ceramics into their individual art practices.
 

DRAMA

Shakespeare for the Intimidated

DRAM 3850 Y (Calgary Campus)
3.0 Credit Hours

A performance-based approach to the study of Shakespeare. We will engage in a variety of activities and presentations to make the text relevant and bring it to life. We will view and analyze stage and film productions of the plays as well as study their historical context.

Prerequisites: Completion of 15 University courses (a minimum of 45.0 credit hours) or admission to the Post Diploma program.

 

NEW MEDIA

The Human Side of Interaction

NMED 2850 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
This is an interdisciplinary course to survey and examine the theories and applications of Human Factors research and their implementations in user interface (UI) and user experience (UX) related interaction design. The students will be introduced to a broad range of topics including historical reviews, influential theories, industry and market trends, and practical methodologies via introductory lectures and project-based learning reinforcements. They will be challenged to expand their understandings of today’s world of design and technology by taking a closer look at the key considerations of human factors behind real products in our daily life. This course will cover the interrelations between subcategories of such studies, and their impacts to our society and our daily life. The students will acquire an in-depth understanding to the importance of these topics, especially when it comes to their impacts on human-computer-interaction (HCI) based New Media design.
 
Prerequisite: Second-year standing (a minimum of 30.0 credit hours)
 
 

Developing Media for Children

NMED 4850 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
Through brainstorming activities, prototyping, and field-testing with representatives of the target audience, students will work in multi-disciplinary teams to design and develop educational apps for mobile devices to be used in a K-12 classroom.
 
Prerequisites: New Media 3380 and New Media 3520 OR Computer Science 3770
 
 

ART

Queer Arts

ART 2015/3015 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
TBA
 
Prerequisite(s) Art 3015:  Four of: [Art 2005 or Art 2006], Art 2010, Art 2015, Art 2023, Art 2027, Art 2033, [Art 2060 or Art 2061], or Art 2350/Indigenous Studies 2350 AND 15 university-level courses (a minimum of 45.0 credit hours)
 

Senior Studio I & II

ART 4048 & 4049
6.0 Credit Hours
 
The following instructors will be available as supervising faculty members for the above mentioned classes in Fall 2024:
  • Katie Bruce
  • Miguel Solis
Students who register for these courses will interview with each of the supervising faculty members to determine which faculty member will be their instructor of record.  Students must ensure they are registered in the correct section of the course with their assigned instructor by the end of the add/drop period.
 

Art, Museums, and Activism

ARHI 3151
3.0 Credit Hours
 
This course will explore recent work in museums in relation to social change, with a focus on key case studies: work by museums around decolonization and repatriation; ACT UP and work by artists addressing gender and sexuality; and work by museums and artists to address the climate crisis.  The course will include theoretical and practical components to support an intersectional approach to the topics, a focus on Canadian museums and artists, and attention to strategies for museums to create effective audience engagement. With the university located on traditional Blackfoot territory, Blackfoot perspectives will be central to the course.
 
Prerequisite(s): Art History 1002 or Third-year standing (a minimum of 60.0 credit hours)
 

Critical Issues in Contemporary Indigenous Art

ARHI 3152 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 

This course examines current critical issues in contemporary Indigenous art and visual culture from across the settler-colonial areas of North American, as well as Australia and New Zealand. We will explore how Indigenous arts are understood in the communities in which they are made, how indigenous artworks have been understood in Western art historical discourse and museum exhibitions, as well as the relationship between “historic” and “contemporary” indigenous arts. This course will investigate the recent role of indigenous art in the questioning of identity and self-representation, decolonization, sovereignty, self-determination, and anti-colonial resistance. The course will rely heavily on course readings and class participation, structured like a seminar it is organized both thematically and geographically in order to address the specific concerns of the land, visual culture, survivance, and Indigeneity

Prerequisite(s): One of Art History 1001, Art History 1002, or Third-year standing (a minimum of 60.0 credit hours)

 
 

DRAMA

Screen Acting: Theory and Analysis

CINE 4850 / DRAM 4850 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
A study of major stylistic approaches to performance throughout the history of film, television, and other media, and an overview of prominent theories that focus on the work of screen actors. Students will acquire specialized means of understanding screen actors’ expressive capabilities, and the methods to critically examine actors’ performances through close, formal analysis.
 
Prerequisite(s): Cinema 1000 or Drama 1000 AND third year standing (a minimum of 60.0 credit hours)
 

Scenic Painting

DRAM 3821 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
This course is designed to give an introduction to the theory and techniques of scenic painting for a variety of theatrical applications, including properties. Students will learn about the products, tools and techniques of scenic paint for the stage, as well as explore the elements and principals of scenography. This class will include both lectures, demonstrations and the physical practice of scenic painting.
 

Stage Makeup

DRAM 3821 B
3.0 Credit Hours
 
This course is designed to give an introduction to the history, practice and design aesthetic of stage makeup. Students will learn about the products, tools and application techniques of makeup for the stage, as well as explore the process of character development through makeup design. This course will combine lectures and demonstrations with physical practice.
 
 

MUSIC

Listening to Music

MUSI 3000 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
In this class, students will learn about a variety of perspectives from which to think about listening to music. This approach will reinforce the concept that music is a communicative experience, involving not just compositions to be studied (in some cases) but also participatory acts of what Christopher Small calls musicking. By focusing in this class on listening, students will become aware of different contexts for musicking, and thus different social functions for music. Students will come away with an understanding of how music has been, and continues to be, used by humans for a vast array of purposes. Moreover, through a variety of theoretical perspectives on listening, students will gain a broader understanding of how music’s communicated meanings are not objectively determinate, but rather highly dependent on context. Student’s can expect an emphasis on reading and class discussion.
 
Prerequisite(s): One of Music 3090 OR Music 3480
 

History of Rock and Roll to 1970

MUSI 3200 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
This course is designed to give the student a historical overview of the development of rock ‘n roll from its roots up until the end of the 60’s. This will be presented in a chronological manner, beginning with a brief overview of rock ‘n roll’s ancestors and influences. It will go on to study the musical and cultural melting pot of the 1950’s, followed by the effects of the British Invasion of the 60’s. A discussion of developments occurring in North America following the British Invasion will be the culminating point of this class.
 
Prerequisite(s): 15 university-level courses (a minimum of 45.0 credit hours) - as per calendar
Equivalent: Music 3200 – History of Rock and Roll: 1948-1970
NOTE: Not counted in the 16-course Arts & Science major or the core courses in the B.Mus. degree.
NOTE: Students with credit in Music 2850 (History of Rock ‘n Roll), 2850 (3850) (Popular Music in the 20th Century) or 3010 cannot receive credit for the same offering in the Music 3200 series.
NOTE: Credit is not allowed for MUSI 3200 - History of Rock & Roll to 1970 and MUSI 3200 History of Rock and Roll: 1948-1970 or MUSI 3200 – History of Rock and Roll
 

History of Jazz

MUSI 3200 B
3.0 Credit Hours
 
This course provides a comprehensive overview of jazz history, covering the major jazz styles and important musicians that have pioneered this music. We will trace jazz from its infancy, beginning in New Orleans and will highlight how this music has developed through the years and has grown into various sub-genres. Some of the styles that will be covered include: Early Jazz, Swing Era, Bebop, Cool and Fusion.  Other topics will include learning important jazz terminology, becoming acquainted with the preeminent jazz artists within each style and most importantly analyzing how jazz has evolved and inspired other music genres since early in the twentieth-century. 
 
Prerequisite(s): 15 university-level courses (a minimum of 45.0 credit hours)
NOTE: Not counted in the 16-course Arts and Science Music major or the core courses in the B.Mus. degree.
 
 

NEW MEDIA

New Media Soundscapes

NMED 2850 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
This course explores the theory, practice and history of sound and sound-based media. A primary aim is to analyze historical contingencies and contemporary complexities of sound and sound-based media as social and cultural phenomena. Emphasis is placed on understanding the often-overlooked role sonic media plays in current and emergent digital technologies and practices, including social media, advertising, music and podcasting. We will also develop and practice basic tools and techniques of digital sound production for various genres, including podcasting, sound for film and games, and sound art. 
 

Advacned Game Design Studio

NMED 3850 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
Building on fundamental game design skills, this course will challenge students to make increasingly complex and intricate games while also guiding them further into the production and release process. The course will culminate in a capstone final, polished game.
 
Prerequisite(s): New Media 3310
 

Art & Imagination Anthropocene

NMED 3850 B
3.0 Credit Hours
 
Welcome to the Anthropocene, a world on the brink of a constellation of ecological, social, and economic catastrophes. In this studio course we’ll explore what is at stake and the urgent need to attune ourselves to an interconnected world, a practice long-held by Indigenous cultures. We’ll critically examine and creatively respond to such topics as: representation and reality; questions of consciousness; the ramifications of AI; the paranormal; the dearth of meaning in contemporary culture; and what the non-human world communicates, to bring into practice what we might call an “everyday magik”, a way of being and interacting that respects the netted nature of our world.
 
Prerequisite(s): Third-year standing (a minimum of 60.0 credit hours)
 

Emerging Video Technology

NMED 3850 C
3.0 Credit Hours
 
A studio intensive in moving image creation. Students are encouraged to pursue new innovations in video creation including immersive installation, 360° video, projection mapping and video applications for augmented and virtual reality.
 
Prerequisite(s): New Media 2030 or Third-year standing (a minimum of 60.0 credit hours) and a skills based assessment. 
 

Documentary Video Production

NMED 3850 D
3.0 Credit Hours
 
An introduction to the art and craft of documentary video creation. Students will explore the techniques and strategies used in making compelling documentary video including research, storytelling, videography and post-production. Through studio practice, students will gain an understanding of documentary and its complicated role in contemporary media.
 
Prerequisite(s): NMED 2030
 

AI, Immortality, Art, & Identity

NMED 4850
3.0 Credit Hours
 
Benign assistants or robot overlords? In this seminar/studio course we’ll explore the promises and perils of Artificial Intelligence. Through readings, viewings, and hands-on experimentation with AIs, we’ll engage in a cross-disciplinary conversation around the existential, ethical, and practical ramifications of AIs.
 
Prerequisite(s): Fourth year standing (a minimum of 90.0 credit hours) in a BFA New Media program.
 

ART

Performance Art

ART 3015 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
This course will provide an introduction to performance art. Blending analysis of works by foundational and contemporary performance artists with hands-on embodied performance practice development, this course aims to give an overview of the history and practice of this complex form of meaning-making and question-asking. We will look at a range of works, focusing on contributions by artists who consider questions of gender, race and sexuality, power, place and institution through their performance work. The course will revisit canonical works by founding members of Indigenous and feminist movements from the 60s onward, as well as contemporary contributions from various queer, Black and Latinx cultural movements found globally. In performance workshops students will focus on core skills of performing using the body, gravity and time. Through a tacit process of experimentation, giving/receiving feedback, and project revision, students can expect to create works that examine intersections of performance with video, audio, object and site-specific influences.
 

Digital Fabrication

ART 3015 B
3.0 Credit Hours
 
A beginners-level introduction to techniques and concepts of art production through computer-aided design and fabrication. Students will be introduced to 2D/3D modelling software, CNC (computer-numerical control) machining, and 3D printing methods. An emphasis will be placed on exploring critical and creative ways of combining digital design and fabrication with drawing, painting, photography, sculpture, and/or installation.
 

Senior Studio I & II

ART 4048 & 4049
6.0 Credit Hours
 
The following instructors will be available as supervising faculty members for the above mentioned classes in Spring 2024:
  • Mary Kavanagh
  • Katie Bruce
Students who register for these courses will interview with each of the supervising faculty members to determine which faculty member will be their instructor of record.  Students must ensure they are registered in the correct section of the course with their assigned instructor by the end of the add/drop period.
 

Experimental Cinema and Artists' Videos

ARHI 4150 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
This course surveys the history of artist-produced experimental cinema and video art. Students will be exposed to examples of film as art from its origins in the Dada, Surrealist, Expressionist, and Constructivist movements of the 1920s through to later developments of the 1960s and 70s. Artist videos will be considered from their beginnings in the late 1960s through to the present day.
 
Prerequisite: One of  ARHI or ARHI 1002 AND third-year standing (60.0 credit hours)
NOTE: Credit is not allowed for ARHI 4150 - Experimental Cinema and Artists’ Videos and ARHI 3151 - Experimental Cinema and Artists’ Videos (prior to 2023/2024).
 
 
 

DRAMA

Smartphone Cinema

CINE 2850 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
An introduction to the essentials of visual storytelling and basic techniques of filmmaking utilizing smartphone technology to complete a variety of practical exercises and projects to craft cohesive narratives.
 
Note: Projects are completed on both the iOS and macOS platforms. Students are required to have their own iPhone and to download free and/or purchase specified iOS apps as required course materials. Contact instructor for details.
 

French-Canadian Cinema: Origins to Present

CINE 3850 CL/MODL 3850 A
CRN: 10917
3.0 Credit Hours
 

Mask Making

DRAM 3821 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
An exploration into how masks have historically, culturally and stylistically been used combined with an introduction to the basic concepts, methods, materials and skills of mask making, with emphasis on practical theatrical masks.
 

Applied Sound Design and Production

DRAM 3850 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
An exploration of the theory and craft of applied theatrical sound design and production through the creation of soundscapes integral to dramatic narratives integrated with live musical performance. Skills and techniques will be developed to control the sound environment for live performances of a faculty-led production in the department's season.
 
Prerequisite: Drama 2810 OR Music 2510
Note: Students planning on enrolling in Drama 3850 - Applied Sound Design and Production are advised to contact the course instructor for additional details about this course offering.
 

Canadian One-Woman Plays

DRAM 4150 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
This course will involve an exploration of solo plays written by woman-identifying residents of Canada/Turtle Island. Theories of autobiography and audience reception will support our reading and writing about the many ways solo artists engage with audiences through live performance.
 

Applied Theatre for Progressive Social Change and Community Building

DRAM 4850 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
The application of inclusive, performance-based ensemble building and storytelling techniques to create community and progressive social change with marginalized communities.
 
Prerequisite: Two of Drama 3310, 3420, or 3740
 
 
 

FINE ARTS

Introduction to Visual and Cultural Studies

FA 2850 A/LBED 2850 CL
3.0 Credit Hours
 
Introduction to Visual and Cultural Studies: Visual images shape our worlds. From our sense of self to our politics, our relation to the world is negotiated through visual images. This interdisciplinary course will introduce various theoretical frameworks for interpreting visual and material culture. It will introduce key thinkers and theories about cultural studies to provide students skills for the critical analysis of the world around us. Topics may include construction of identities, visuality and power, activism and protest in various medias including art, popular culture, social media, news, etc.
 

From Stage to Online Streaming: How Canadian Sketch Comedy Changed the World

FA 3850 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
Eugene Levy, Mike Meyers, Lilly Singh. Canadian sketch comedy punches above its weight-class when it comes to all things ‘funny.’ This course explores online up-and-coming Canadian sketch comedy troupes and contrasts them with previous trailblazers. Students will learn of Canada’s rich heritage in sketch comedy and how comedy troupes have influenced popular culture here and abroad.
 
Using hands-on writing exercises and relevant media presentations, students will gain an intimate knowledge of how sketches are created and staged. They will apply this knowledge to create streaming-based sketches of their own.
 
Prerequisite(s): 15 university-level courses (a minimum of 45.0 credit hours)
 
 
 

MUSIC

Music Performance Strategies: Practice Techniques, Performance Anxiety, and Psychology

MUSI 3000 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
An exploration of various causes and potential strategies regarding performance anxiety that is frequently encountered by all levels of musicians and performers. 
 
Prerequisite: One of Music 3360 or Music 3460

 

History of Rock and Roll Since 1970

MUSI 3200 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
This course is meant to be a follow‑up course to the History of Rock and Roll to 1970.  It will cover the fragmentation of rock 'n' roll styles through the seventies and eighties and nineties, beginning with the trends of the late sixties, through the mass marketing of the early seventies, moving to the technological boom that characterized much of eighties rock and roll, and ending with rock alternatives and Alternative rock and roll from the nineties.
 
Equivalent: Music 3200 – History of Rock and Roll: 1968-1990
Prerequisite: 15 university-level courses (a minimum of 45.0 credit hours) - as per calendar
NOTE: Not counted in the 16-course Arts & Science major or the core courses in the B.Mus. degree
NOTE: Students with credit in Music 2850 (History of Rock ‘n Roll), 2850 (3850) (Popular Music in the 20th Century) or 3010 cannot receive credit for the same offering in the Music 3200 series.
NOTE: Credit is not allowed for MUSI 3200 – History of Rock and Roll, and either of MUSI 3200 - History of Rock and Roll: 1948-1970 or MUSI 3200 – History of Rock and Roll: 1968-1990. 
 

Classical Music Recording

MUSI 3850 D (DAA Majors) & M (Music Majors)
3.0 Credit Hours
 
Classical Music Recording Techniques will take students through the process of classical music recording and production. Students can enroll as either recording engineers or as classical music performers. Over the semester, students will focus on the major aspects of the recording process such as score preparation and pre-production, artistic guidance, approaches to recording in venues such as concert halls, microphone techniques, and digital editing. The goal is to instill the creative and technical aspects of a classical recording session for the audio students. Performance students will learn how to prepare for a recording session and receive valuable session experience. Both groups will finish with an understanding of the process through both theoretical and practical experiences as well as with recordings for their portfolios. 
 
Prerequisite: Music 2260 AND One of Music 2550 or Music Studio 3448.
Note: Credit is not allowed for both Music 3850 (Classical Music Recording) and Music 3730 (Tonmeister: Classical Music Recording)
 

Electronic and Popular Music Production

MUSI 3850 NA
3.0 Credit Hours
 
This course is designed for students who have little to no knowledge of electronic music production but who have experience using a Digital Audio Workstation. It introduces the necessary tools and techniques to produce electronic music in different styles including House, Techno, Electro/French House, Trance, and Drum and Bass. Students will research and present the history as well as important cultural and technological aspects of these music styles. Students explore production techniques in Logic Pro for each genre and collaborate to create productions of their own.  .
 
Prerequisite: Music 2550
 

Play Time: The Theory and Practice of Free Improvisation

MUSI 3850 NB
3.0 Credit Hours
 
In this course, we examine improvisation, musicality, and play as a means of building musical and listening skills. Participants explore various musical concepts for improvisation that, while not attached to any one style of music, are applicable to all types of creative play, including play in the music classroom. We apply improvisation activities directly to our primary instruments, which may include the singing voice and virtual instruments played with digital controllers. Through their primary instruments, participants engage in improvisation exercises and creative projects aimed at discovering one's natural musical voice.
 
Recommended Background: Intermediate-level ability to plan an instrument
Prerequisite: 15 university-level courses (a minimum of 45.0 credit hours)
 
 
 

NEW MEDIA

Crisis Theory and Digital Culture

NMED 3850 B
3.0 Credit Hours
 
How do contemporary media technologies solve, exacerbate, or even create social crises? This course provides an overview of key thinkers, concepts and approaches within the field of critical crisis studies, then uses them to analyze contemporary crises. In doing so, we explore questions relevant to diverse fields, including economics (Will AI take our jobs?), politics (Does social media undermine democracy?), and environment (Can machine learning help humans adapt to climate change?)
 
Prerequisites: Third-year standing (a minimum of 60.0 credit hours)
 

Social Issues in Games

NMED 3850 C
3.0 Credit Hours
 
Video games carry tremendous social and cultural power, but are often cast as simple, value-free forms of mass entertainment. In this course, we will unpack the ways that video games affect our social and cultural world and explore a variety of areas that game creators have attempted to address with their work. Topics covered in the course include, representation, gender, environmentalism, and labor.
 
Prerequisites: 15-university level courses (a minimum of 45.0 credit hours)
 

Visual Effects

NMED 3850 D
3.0 Credit Hours
 
An introduction to video compositing, motion design and computer-generated imagery (CGI).
 
Prerequisites: New Media 2030