Topics/Series Courses

A topics course is one that is not regularly offered at the University of Lethbridge. Departments may use topics courses to try out a new course that they are considering regularizing, or for faculty to offer courses related to their research. Series courses are a group of courses within a certain genre and the offering changes every semester.  You may take multiple topics and series courses for credit as long as each offering is distinct (i.e. having significantly different titles).

If you have any questions about topics courses, please contact the Fine Arts Advising Office (W660).

Summer & Fall 2021 - Topics/Series Courses

SUMMER 2021

Introduction to Ceramic Art

ART 2850 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 

This course will explore approaches to working with ceramic materials in a fine arts context. Basic construction methods and surface design techniques will be taught alongside discussions of contemporary theoretical approaches to working with ceramics. Special attention will be given to assisting students with strategies for incorporating ceramics into their individual art practices. 

 

FALL 2021

Critical Issues in Contemporary Indigenous Art History

ARHI 3152 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
This course examines current critical issues in contemporary Indigenous art and visual culture from across the settler-colonial areas of North American, as well as Australia and New Zealand. We will explore how Indigenous arts are understood in the communities in which they are made, how indigenous artworks have been understood in Western art historical discourse and museum exhibitions, as well as the relationship between “historic” and “contemporary” indigenous arts. This course will investigate the recent role of indigenous art in the questioning of identity and self-representation, decolonization, sovereignty, self-determination, and anti-colonial resistance. The course will rely heavily on course readings and class participation, structured like a seminar it is organized both thematically and geographically in order to address the specific concerns of the land, visual culture, survivance, and Indigeneity.
 

Advanced Studio

ART 3040
6.0 Credit Hours
 
The following instructors will be available as supervising faculty members for the above mentioned classes in Fall 2021:
  • Annie Martin
  • Don Gill
Students who register for these courses will interview with each of the supervising faculty members to determine which faculty member will be their instructor of record.  Students must ensure they are registered in the correct section of the course with their assigned instructor by the end of the add/drop period.
 

Senior Studio

ART 4048 & 4049
6.0 Credit Hours
 
The following instructors will be available as supervising faculty members for the above mentioned classes in Fall 2021:
  • Annie Martin
  • Don Gill
Students who register for these courses will interview with each of the supervising faculty members to determine which faculty member will be their instructor of record.  Students must ensure they are registered in the correct section of the course with their assigned instructor by the end of the add/drop period.

SUMMER 2021

Shakespeare for the Intimidated

DRAM 3850 Y (Calgary Campus)
3.0 Credit Hours
 

A performance-based approach to the study of Shakespeare. We will engage in a variety of activities and presentations to make the text relevant and bring it to life. We will view and analyze stage and film productions of the plays as well as study their historical context.

Prerequisite: Completion of 15 University courses (a minimum of 45.0 credit hours) or admission to the Post Diploma program

 

FALL 2021

Stage Makeup

DRAM 3821 A
3.0 Credit Hours

 

Alternative Material and Methods in Costume Design

DRAM 3821 B
3.0 Credit Hours
 
Prerequisite: Drama 2825
 
 

SUMMER 2021

History of Rock and Roll to 1970

MUSI 3200 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
This course is designed to give the student a historical overview of the development of rock ‘n roll from its roots up until the end of the 60’s. This will be presented in a chronological manner, beginning with a brief overview of rock ‘n roll’s ancestors and influences. It will go on to study the musical and cultural melting pot of the 1950’s, followed by the effects of the British Invasion of the 60’s. A discussion of developments occurring in North America following the British Invasion will be the culminating point of this class.
 
Prerequisite: 15 university-level courses (a minimum of 45.0 credit hours) - as per calendar
Equivalent: Music 3200 – History of Rock and Roll: 1948-1970
NOTE: Not counted in the 16-course Arts & Science major or the core courses in the B.Mus. degree.
NOTE: Students with credit in Music 2850 (History of Rock ‘n Roll), 2850 (3850) (Popular Music in the 20th Century) or 3010 cannot receive credit for the same offering in the Music 3200 series.
NOTE: Credit is not allowed for MUSI 3200 - History of Rock & Roll to 1970 and MUSI 3200 History of Rock and Roll: 1948-1970 or MUSI 3200 – History of Rock and Roll
 

FALL 2021

Seminar in Jazz History

MUSI 3000 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 

This course provides a comprehensive overview of jazz history, covering the major jazz styles and important musicians that have pioneered this music. We will trace jazz from its infancy, beginning in New Orleans and will highlight how this music has developed through the years and has grown into various sub-genres. Some of the styles that will be covered include: Early Jazz, Swing Era, Bebop, Cool and Fusion.

Other topics will include learning important jazz terminology, becoming acquainted with the preeminent jazz artists within each style, and most importantly analyzing how jazz has evolved and inspired other music genres since early in the twentieth-century. We will connect the important stylistic periods of the past and trace the various directions these trends have gone since. This course will provide students the opportunity to broaden their understanding and appreciation of this diverse music form. This course provides a broad overview of jazz history, covering the major jazz styles and important musicians that have pioneered this music. We will trace jazz from its infancy, beginning in New Orleans and will highlight how this music has developed through the years and has grown into various sub-genres.

Prerequisites: Music 3460 – Theory IV

 

History of Rock and Roll to 1970

MUSI 3200 N
3.0 Credit Hours
 
This course is designed to give the student a historical overview of the development of rock ‘n roll from its roots up until the end of the 60’s. This will be presented in a chronological manner, beginning with a brief overview of rock ‘n roll’s ancestors and influences. It will go on to study the musical and cultural melting pot of the 1950’s, followed by the effects of the British Invasion of the 60’s. A discussion of developments occurring in North America following the British Invasion will be the culminating point of this class.
 
Prerequisite: 15 university-level courses (a minimum of 45.0 credit hours) - as per calendar
Equivalent: Music 3200 – History of Rock and Roll: 1948-1970
NOTE: Not counted in the 16-course Arts & Science major or the core courses in the B.Mus. degree.
NOTE: Students with credit in Music 2850 (History of Rock ‘n Roll), 2850 (3850) (Popular Music in the 20th Century) or 3010 cannot receive credit for the same offering in the Music 3200 series.
NOTE: Credit is not allowed for MUSI 3200 - History of Rock & Roll to 1970 and MUSI 3200 History of Rock and Roll: 1948-1970 or MUSI 3200 – History of Rock and Roll

SUMMER 2021

From Stage to Online Streaming: How Canadian Sketch Comedy Changed the World

NMED 3850 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 

Eugene Levy, Mike Meyers, Lilly Singh. Canadian sketch comedy punches above its weight-class when it comes to all things ‘funny.’ This course explores online up-and-coming Canadian sketch comedy troupes and contrasts them with previous trailblazers. Students will learn of Canada’s rich heritage in sketch comedy and how comedy troupes have influenced popular culture here and abroad.

Using hands-on writing exercises and relevant media presentations, students will gain an intimate knowledge of how sketches are created and staged. They will apply this knowledge to create streaming-based sketches of their own.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of 15 courses (a minimum of 45.0 credit hours)