Topics/Series Courses

A topics course is one that is not regularly offered at the University of Lethbridge. Departments may use topics courses to try out a new course that they are considering regularizing, or for faculty to offer courses related to their research. Series courses are a group of courses within a certian genre and the offering changes every semester.  You may take multiple topics and series courses for credit as long as each offering is distinct (i.e. having significantly different titles).

If you have any questions about topics courses, please contact the Fine Arts Advising Office (W660).

Spring 2021 Topics/Series Courses

Advanced Studio

ART 3040
6.0 Credit Hours
 

The following instructors will be available as supervising faculty members for the above mentioned classes in Spring 2021:

  • Annie Martin
  • David Miller

Students who register for these courses will interview with each of the supervising faculty members to determine which faculty member will be their instructor of record.  Students must ensure they are registered in the correct section of the course with their assigned instructor by the end of the add/drop period.

 

LandMarks 2021 - Spatial Storytelling: Land, Art, Place and Community

ART 3850 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 

The Indigenous worldview maintains that history is something ‘written on the land’—that the landscape is itself an animate, living, and embodied archive. From this perspective, this course endeavors to explore what Vine Deloria jr. called the ‘spatiality’ of storytelling—how stories can be dimensional as well as durational; how narratives are intricately interconnected with ‘place’, the landscape and the environment. LandMarks is a studio-based course where students independently apply conceptual, technical and creative skills in the research and production of contemporary art projects in the areas of photo, video, drawing, sculpture, performance, installation, and interdisciplinary practices. At its core, this course is about embodied storytelling, and the ways in which we might ‘participate’ with the landscape while exploring our individual relationships with the living archive of a specific location, and its rich cultural histories. This course is On-Line for Spring 2021. 

Prerequisite: Completion of 15 university-level courses (a minimum of 45.0 credit hours)

 

Senior Studio

Art 4048 & 4049
6.0 Credit Hours
 

The following instructors will be available as supervising faculty members for the above mentioned classes in Spring 2021:

  • Annie Martin
  • David Miller

Students who register for these courses will interview with each of the supervising faculty members to determine which faculty member will be their instructor of record.  Students must ensure they are registered in the correct section of the course with their assigned instructor by the end of the add/drop period.

The Artistic Core in a Multidisciplinary Life

DRAM 3850 N
3.0 Credit Hours
 

This course focuses on guest artists who will join the class for lectures, discussions, and work sessions centered around holding the integrity of your artistic voice in various creative contexts. We will hear the first-hand accounts and techniques used by diverse theatre professionals in different areas of theatre, and all levels of experience.

Prerequisite: Drama 2100, Drama 2810, and completion of 15 university level courses (a minimum of 45.0 credit hours)

 

Speech Communications II

Drama 3850 Y (Calgary Campus)
3.0 Credit Hours
 
Building on the skills and experience of Drama 2350, this course is designed to expand and deepen the students' ability and facility with speech communication.  It is an entirely studio-based course which focuses on exploring a variety of modes of communication. Through plenty of practice and experiential learning, students will enhance the capacity to speak effectively and affectively before an audience. 
 
Prerequisite: Drama 2350 OR third-year standing (a minimum of 60.0 credit hours)
 

Seminar in Music - Issues in Performance Pedagogy

MUSI 3000 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
In this course, we will take a critical look at historical and current movements in music performance pedagogy and their effects on technical and artistic development, mental and physical health, and interaction with community and social issues.  Although the first part of the course will cover topics dealing with general music study, we will follow with specific focus on instrumental/vocal topics determined by the make-up of the class.
 
Pre-requisite: Completion of 20 university-level courses (a minimum of 60.0 credit hours)

 

History of Jazz

MUSI 3200 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
This course provides a comprehensive overview of jazz history, covering the major jazz styles and important musicians that have pioneered this music. We will trace jazz from its infancy, beginning in New Orleans and will highlight how this music has developed through the years and has grown into various sub-genres. Some of the styles that will be covered include: Early Jazz, Swing Era, Bebop, Cool and Fusion.  Other topics will include learning important jazz terminology, becoming acquainted with the preeminent jazz artists within each style and most importantly analyzing how jazz has evolved and inspired other music genres since early in the twentieth-century. 
 
Prerequisite: 15 university-level courses (a minimum of 45.0 credit hours)
NOTE: Not counted in the 16-course Arts and Science Music major or the core courses in the B.Mus. degree.

 

History of Rock & Roll Since 1970

MUSI 3200 B
3.0 Credit Hours

This course is meant to be a follow‑up course to the History of Rock and Roll to 1970.  It will cover the fragmentation of rock 'n' roll styles through the seventies and eighties and nineties, beginning with the trends of the late sixties, through the mass marketing of the early seventies, moving to the technological boom that characterized much of eighties rock and roll, and ending with rock alternatives and Alternative rock and roll from the nineties.
 
Equivalent: Music 3200 – History of Rock and Roll: 1968-1990
Prerequisite: 15 university-level courses (a minimum of 45.0 credit hours) - as per calendar
NOTE: Not counted in the 16-course Arts & Science major or the core courses in the B.Mus. degree
NOTE: Students with credit in Music 2850 (History of Rock ‘n Roll), 2850 (3850) (Popular Music in the 20th Century) or 3010 cannot receive credit for the same offering in the Music 3200 series.
NOTE: Credit is not allowed for MUSI 3200 – History of Rock and Roll, and either of MUSI 3200 - History of Rock and Roll: 1948-1970 or MUSI 3200 – History of Rock and Roll: 1968-1990. 
 
 

History of Rock and Roll to 1970

MUSI 3200 Y (Calgary Campus)
3.0 Credit Hours
 
This course is designed to give the student a historical overview of the development of rock ‘n roll from its roots up until the end of the 60’s. This will be presented in a chronological manner, beginning with a brief overview of rock ‘n roll’s ancestors and influences. It will go on to study the musical and cultural melting pot of the 1950’s, followed by the effects of the British Invasion of the 60’s. A discussion of developments occurring in North America following the British Invasion will be the culminating point of this class.
 
Prerequisite: 15 university-level courses (a minimum of 45.0 credit hours) - as per calendar
Equivalent: Music 3200 – History of Rock and Roll: 1948-1970
NOTE: Not counted in the 16-course Arts & Science major or the core courses in the B.Mus. degree.
NOTE: Students with credit in Music 2850 (History of Rock ‘n Roll), 2850 (3850) (Popular Music in the 20th Century) or 3010 cannot receive credit for the same offering in the Music 3200 series.
NOTE: Credit is not allowed for MUSI 3200 - History of Rock & Roll to 1970 and MUSI 3200 History of Rock and Roll: 1948-1970 or MUSI 3200 – History of Rock and Roll
 

Interactive Technology: Web Essentials

NMED 2000 Y (Calgary Campus)
3.0 Credit Hours
 
An introduction to website authorship through the use of current content management systems and online platforms.
 
NOTE: Credit is not allowed for New Media 2000 - Interactive Technology: Web Essentials subsequent to completion of New Media 3520

 

Internet Television Production

NMED 2850 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
This course provides a theoretical and practical approach to understanding the elements of multi-camera Internet television production. Students will develop and create a series of short programs relevant to the university and local communities.
 

Prerequisites: Second-year standing (a minimum of 30.0 credit hours)

 

Games in Human History

NMED 3850 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
This course provides a historical survey of games and the evolution of games across time and through various cultures, beginning with ancient board games (3500 BC) and ending with modern board, video, card, and war games. The course will cover the various functions which games have served (entertainment, gambling, status, competition) as well as the long-standing human interest in play, chance, rules, and competition. Emphasis will be placed on the evolution of games throughout history, the application of key technologies which have been used to create games (wood working, metallurgy, glass/stone work, paper and printing, electronics and computing), and the social structures and fandom which coalesce around games. An overarching goal will be to illustrate the similarities between ancient and modern forms of games, including the reasons and motivations which have throughout history drove humans to create and experiment with games.
 
Prerequisites: Third-year standing (a minimum of 60.0 credit hours)