Faculty of Arts & Science

CREATE. INQUIRE. DISCOVER.

Welcome to the Faculty of Arts & Science

We are the founding academic faculty at the University of Lethbridge with over 40 disciplines.

Oki, and welcome to the University of Lethbridge. Our University’s Blackfoot name is Iniskim, meaning Sacred Buffalo Stone. The University is located in traditional Blackfoot Confederacy territory. We honour the Blackfoot people and their traditional ways of knowing in caring for this land, as well as all Aboriginal peoples who have helped shape and continue to strengthen our University community.

The Faculty of Arts & Science offers three very diverse degree programs: Bachelor of Arts (BA), Bachelor of Arts and Science (BASc), and Bachelor of Science (BSc). As a liberal education based system, you must select courses from the humanities, social sciences, and sciences as part of your degree program requirements. As such, you have the opportunity to study from within your areas of interest even if these areas are not part of your major. You can make your uLethbridge degree exactly that - YOUR degree - individualized to what you want to study.

The Faculty of Arts & Science stands with all those who seek a world free from the racism and related violence that plagues our world and our community. Read the full statement from Matthew G. Letts, Incoming Dean, Faculty of Arts & Science.

Arts & Science Events

2020/2021 PUBlic Professor Series
Trevor Harrison

PUBlic Professor Series | Dr. Trevor Harrison

We are excited to present our next PUBlic Professor Series talk of the 2020/21 season!

Join sociology professor, Dr. Trevor Harrison, as he explores The Promise and Peril of Populism.

Thursday, January 28, 2021 7-9 p.m.
Live Online
. Register here.

Other Events
Dr. Mai Ishihara

沈黙silence/痛みpain/言葉speech: the invisible and subalternized ‘self’ towards decolonization/hope

The History Colloquium Series invites you to this talk with guest speaker, Dr. Mai Ishihara.

Day/Date: Thursday, January 21, 2021
Time: 7 p.m.
Location: Zoom Live Presentation

Register at http://ow.ly/jbSi50D5z2f. Registration is required.

Migrant Dreams

The University of Lethbridge Anti-Racism Film Series invites you to Migrant Dreams.

Friday, February 5, 2021, at 5 p.m.

The University of Lethbridge Anti-Racism Film Series invites you to a film screening of  the documentary "Migrant Dreams" followed by a Q&A with Film Director Min Sook Lee &  Dr. Evelyn Encalada Grez (Simon Fraser University).

WDCAG 2021

Beyond 2020: Geographical Research in Times of Crises

We are pleased to announce that WDCAG 2021 will be hosted remotely by the Department of Geography & Environment at the University of Lethbridge.

March 5-6, 2021 online from Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada

The 63rd Annual Meeting of the Western Division of the Canadian Association of Geographers (WDCAG) will be hosted by the Department of Geography & Environment at the University of Lethbridge (U of L) on March 5-6, 2021. Geographers from all fields of geography and related disciplines are invited to attend remotely.

Faculty News

Researchers find potential new diagnostic tool to help pregnant women at risk

Collaborative effort between the University of Lethbridge, and other Alberta universities has identified a new technique to help identify women at risk of metabolic disorders

Between three and 20 per cent of pregnant women in Canada develop gestational diabetes mellitus, or GDM, and the health of both the mother and her developing child can be negatively affected if left untreated.

A study by researchers at the University of Lethbridge, in collaboration with the University of Calgary and the University of Alberta, has identified a technique that may one day help health-care professionals identify women at risk of developing GDM early in their pregnancy. Their study, Metabolic dysfunction in pregnancy, was recently published by Wiley.

Early research opportunities lead to publications for U of L students

Two University of Lethbridge students can add publications to their resumés after they took advantage of getting involved in research early in their university education. Not only have they published papers in major journals, they’ve also collaborated with other departments within the U of L and internationally.

Marielle Stoutjesdyk, an undergraduate student in the Department of Physics, and Amy Henrickson (BSc ’17), a master’s student in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, work in Dr. Borries Demeler’s lab. Demeler is a Canada 150 Research Chair for Biophysics and director of the Canadian Center for Hydrodynamics, which uses analytical ultracentrifugation to analyze molecules in solution. Photo from left to right are Dr. Borries Demeler, Amy Henrickson and Marielle Stoutjesdyk.

Trushar Patel

Vaccines bring hope to a pandemic-stricken world

News of vaccines under development to combat the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have provided many people with the first sense of optimism for a future beyond the pandemic, and Dr. Trushar Patel, an associate professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Canada Research Chair in RNA and Protein Biophysics, counts himself in that crowd.

“We should be very positive and hopeful,” says Patel. “I’m so excited because, in the next few months, we will likely have an explosion of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines. There are about 48 vaccines in Phase 1, 2 and 3 trials. We have about 160 candidates in pre-clinical trials. We are looking at about 200 vaccines at different stages of development and they use different platforms.”

As the number of COVID-19 cases continues to rise around the globe, health-care systems are being put under extreme stress. The need for effective vaccines, with enough supplies for everyone, is crucial. The response must be global, Patel says, because the virus will keep circulating in countries without a vaccine, giving it the opportunity to mutate, completely change its structure and possibly come back as a new strain of virus.

Saurya Das

University of Lethbridge’s Quantum Alberta researchers pushing towards a second quantum revolution

You likely never think about how your new mobile phone is twice as fast as your last, why you now feel secure making bank transactions remotely, or how Google and Alexa now plan your days — it’s just the world in which we live. The technology, the security, the communicative ability can all be traced to research, and the future of these advances is even brighter thanks to work being done right now by Quantum Alberta researchers, a fifth of whom are based at the University of Lethbridge.

Dr. Saurya Das, in the University’s Department of Physics & Astronomy, is a theme leader of Quantum Alberta, a province-wide platform of more than 35 quantum researchers from the Universities of Lethbridge, Calgary and Alberta. It is made up of physicists, chemists, computer scientists, mathematicians and engineers and promotes and strengthens collaboration between researchers and institutions in quantum science and technology.

News Feed

From Lethbridge to Zurich

Drs. Dylan Johnson (BA ’10) and Matthew Pawlak (BA ’14) never met when they were undergraduates...

Researchers find potential new diagnostic tool to help pregnant women at risk

Collaborative effort between the University of Lethbridge, and other Alberta universities has identified a new...

Early research opportunities lead to publications for U of L students

Two University of Lethbridge students can add publications to their resumés after they took advantage of getting...

God is still doing reasonably well in the polls

A majority of Canadians continue to believe in God, according to the most recent national survey by University of...

Rare celestial event to occur on the Winter Solstice

People will be looking up to the heavens Monday evening hoping to catch a glimpse of the Christmas star —...

Blackfoot Women’s Empowerment project highlights community and collaboration

When Tanya Pace-Crosschild (BSc ’98), director of the Opokaa’sin Early Intervention Society, saw a...

Vaccines bring hope to a pandemic-stricken world

News of vaccines under development to combat the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have...

University of Lethbridge’s Quantum Alberta researchers pushing towards a second quantum revolution

You likely never think about how your new mobile phone is twice as fast as your last, why you now feel secure...

Destination Exploration to offer virtual clubs in January

Destination Exploration (DE) is meeting the need for STEM activities and learning by relaunching their after...

Students jump-start their careers through co-op work terms

The University of Lethbridge has been offering co-op work terms for 30 years, but never before in a pandemic. As a...

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Chasmer research group utilizing remote sensing to increase knowledge of wildland fire potential and behaviour

As wildland fires continue to increase in frequency, size and intensity throughout Canada, University of Lethbridge researchers have received funding to work with the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) — Canada Wildfire Strategic Network, and in collaboration with the Canadian Forest Service.
 
The group, led by Dr. Laura Chasmer in the Department of Geography and Environment, is part of the cooperative research network designed to address national wildland fire science needs and priorities. Dr. Mike Flannigan (University of Alberta) is the principal investigator for the project that includes representation from researchers across the country — a group united in creating better emergency management strategies and informing forest management policy and practices, among others.
Athan Zovoilis

U of L scientists unveil a novel molecular mechanism underlying Alzheimer’s disease

University of Lethbridge genome scientists examining molecular changes in the brain of mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease have shed light on the mechanisms involved in this complex process — one of the first stages in understanding better the molecular basis of this debilitating disease. These preliminary findings can guide the way for future studies to look for new therapeutic targets.

This significant study, led by Dr. Athan Zovoilis, a Canada Research Chair in RNA Bioinformatics and Genomics, was recently published in eLife, a prestigious biomedical and life sciences journal. The study is the result of work within the recently established Southern Alberta Genome Sciences Center (SAGSC) at the U of L, as well as part of the continuing contributions of the Canadian Centre for Behavioural Neuroscience (CCBN) to the field of neurodegenerative diseases.

Stephanie King

U of L post-doc examines long-term effects of environmental exposures during pregnancy, including glyphosate

Dr. Stephanie King, a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Lethbridge, has long been interested in the effects of stress on the developing fetus and how those effects show up in subsequent generations.

While a PhD student at Washington State University, King was involved in a study that looked into whether glyphosate, the primary ingredient in the herbicide Roundup, increased susceptibility to disease across several generations.

“Glyphosate has been a very controversial compound in the public eye, primarily due to the creation of genetically modified Roundup-resistant strains of vegetables and legumes, like corn and soy,” says King. “Many studies have found that glyphosate appears to be safe for single exposures. However, in 2019, there were several studies that called its safety into question.”

Dan O'Donnell

Doing open science in COVID-19 times

While open access to science aims to make scientific research and data easily available to the broader public, it turns out the digital environment may have a few gaps. Dr. Dan O’Donnell, an English professor with expertise in digital humanities, wanted to take a closer look at how science training was faring in the pandemic and he’ll explore the topic thanks to a $50,000 US grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

“Ultimately, the project is to look at how all the different open science training organizations have been adapting to the shutdowns due to COVID-19, what resources they’ve used to adapt and to what degree what they’re doing might be better or pointing to improvements,” says O’Donnell, the principal investigator.

Jennifer Otto

U of L religious studies researcher to examine roots of religious tolerance

Dr. Jennifer Otto, a professor in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Lethbridge, will go back 500 years to delve into the events that eventually led to modern-day human rights, thanks to a grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC).

The free church movement had its origins during the Radical Reformation, which began in the 1520s. Groups such as Mennonites, Hutterites and free evangelical or Baptist congregations believed the church should be separate from state institutions.

“This is now a foundation of modern human rights, the idea that people should have freedom of conscience to practice their religious beliefs how they wish without state interference,” says Otto. “In the 1520s, this was not the case. In fact, quite the opposite. To step out of the state church was punishable by death.”

Canada Foundation for Innovation funding will help U of L researchers pursue a drug treatment for COVID-19

Two U of L researchers have received a $200,000 grant from the Exceptional Opportunities Fund of the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) for infrastructure to aid them in their search to find a drug to treat the SARS-CoV-2 virus that’s responsible for the COVID pandemic. The funding is part of nearly $28 million in research infrastructure support announced by Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development Navdeep Baines. The funding will support 79 projects across the country and covers the urgent need for equipment for ongoing research related to COVID-19.

Introducing David B Hobbs

David B Hobbs joined the University of Lethbridge in the midst of a global pandemic, as an assistant professor in the Department of English. We asked David a few questions so that we can all …

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M.A. candidate Wael Nasser wins top spot in national essay competition

Wael Nasser draws on his community experience and cutting edge research to win top spot in IRCC's national essay competition.

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Introducing Jean-Denys Hamel

Hailing from Quebec City and joining us from his postdoc position at Berkeley, Jean-Denys Hamel will join the U of L as an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry in January 2021. …

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5 questions on “Knowing the World through Sound” with Dr. Steve Ferzacca

This is Dr. Ferzacca's last teaching semester at the University of Lethbridge, and as such, we wanted to catch up with him to discuss his fascinating life, new book and how music …

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Donor support helps train the next generation of scientists

Dr. Roy Golsteyn’s (BSc ’84) Natural Product Laboratory has continues their quest to find the chemicals for the next wave of cancer treatments, making a difference in the lives of Canadians and inspiring …

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Introducing Chelsea Ekstrand

Chelsea Ekstrand joined the University of Lethbridge in the midst of a global pandemic, as an assistant professor in the Department of Neuroscience. We asked Chelsea a few questions so that we can all …

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When Teaching Runs in the Family: Carol, Brittany, and Greg Young

Brittany Young (BA/BEd’17) grew up in a home filled with caring support as her parents returned from teaching each day to talk shop, sharing ideas and perspectives and, always, laughter.

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5 questions with shining graduate Sheadene Morrison (Drama/Education)

Sheadene Morrison graduates this fall with a Bachelor of Arts (Drama) and Bachelor of Education (Dramatic Arts). Sheadene was nominated to be recognized as a Shining Graduate by Drama department chair, Jay Whitehead.

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Meet Shining Student Liam Devitt

Liam Devitt thought their educational path was mapped out until a professor noticed their skill at research. Liam switched to a major in history and has since presented research projects at Lethbridge's Galt Museum …

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Career Bridge: Centre for Work-Integrated Learning and Career Development

Career Bridge

Put Your Knowledge to Work 

Whether you’re looking for a more in-depth learning experience by assisting with research projects on campus or by testing your knowledge in a real-life work setting, we can help! The University of Lethbridge is proud to offer you an exceptional opportunity to explore professional development through academic programs and services designed to give you a competitive edge in a fast-changing world.

You have a bright future — experience it via Career Bridge at uLethbridge!

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