Summer 2022 Courses

How will you spend your summer?

Take summer courses and move ahead in your degree.

It's tempting to spend your summer relaxing, but there are real advantages to taking summer courses. Summer courses let you get classes out of the way faster, and get ahead in your program. You can also complete summer classes to give you a lighter course load in the Fall and Spring semesters.

On this page, we highlight some of the Faculty of Arts & Science courses, many that are not normally offered in the summer.

Summer courses are very popular and fill quickly, so register as soon as you can.

Quick Links: Class Schedule Search and Course Catalogue - Undergraduate Calendar (2021/2022)

 

 

Summer Session I/II/III (May-August)

Credit Hours: 3.00
Lectures, laboratory, and field exercises provide an introduction to the identification, classification, distribution, and ecology of local vascular plants. Mandatory field trips comprise the laboratory component of the course. As this is a field course, students should be prepared for moderately strenuous exercise in a variety of weather conditions.
Delivery: This course is delivered live, in-person during May and June (Summer Session I), however, the nature of the course requires field collections throughout the summer.
Attributes: Science Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course, Bio List 3 Ecology&Evolution
Note: This course has a lab component.

Credit Hours: 3.0
Interdisciplinary approach combining the field of synthetic biology with other disciplines such as computational modelling, design, ethics, management (small business development), and new media. Case-driven learning environment; basic training in state-of-the-art molecular biology techniques; working with and constructing novel genetic building blocks (biobricks). The team will be organized on the lines of a technology start-up company: along with developing a genetically engineered machine, students will be involved in developing business/marketing plans and fundraising.
Prerequisite(s): Second-year standing (a minimum of 30.0 credit hours) AND Application to the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry AND Successful interview
Recommended Background: Biochemistry 2000 OR One of Biology 30, Chemistry 30, Mathematics 30-1, Pure Mathematics 30, or Science 30 and a strong interest in the course
Note: This course is only open to students selected for the University of Lethbridge sponsored team participating in the International Genetically Engineered Machines competition (iGEM) held annually (October) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). For further details contact the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. The course requires eight hours of orientation lectures and 200 hours in the laboratory. Student selection is based on the assumption that, upon completion of the course, students will participate in the iGEM competition.
Attributes: Science Lib Ed Req, Independent Study, Arts & Science or LBED course

3.00 Credit hours

This course will explore a variety of social justice issues in Canada, with a particular focus on the way these issues impact public safety and public safety work. Topics may include some or all of the following: addictions, gender identity/sexual orientation, homelessness, poverty, racism, sexism, and mental health within various public safety institutions (such as policing, corrections, the court system, the education system, health care, and social/family services).

Course Attributes: Social Science Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course

Credit Hours: 3.00
Fundamentals of spoken and written Spanish.
Attributes: Fine Arts and Humanities
Note: For students with little or no knowledge of Spanish. To confirm enrolment and placement, all students must complete the Spanish Student Information Form and then, if required, the placement test, before the first day of classes. Credit for Spanish 1000 will not normally be granted to students with Spanish 30-3Y, 20-6Y, 30-6Y, 10-9Y, 20-9Y, 30-9Y, or equivalent. Students may be able to take this course for credit with permission of the Department of Modern Languages if high school Spanish courses were completed more than five years ago.
Note: This online course is delivered in real-time during the days and times indicated.

Summer Session I (May-June)

Credit Hours: 3.00
The basic concepts of archaeology and archaeological research. Using examples from around the world, emphasis will be placed on understanding fundamental principles and techniques employed in archaeological problem solving. Material covered will include dating and excavation methodologies, material and artifact analysis, culture-environment interaction and critical evaluation of archaeological interpretation.
Attributes: Scie OR Social Scie Lib Ed Req, Introductory Course(0500-1999), Arts & Science or LBED course
Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.00
The foundation of astronomy, including descriptions of such naked-eye observations as eclipses and planetary motions and such basic tools as Kepler's laws, the fundamental properties of light. Material studied: the formation of the solar system, physical structure of planets, evolution of planetary atmospheres, Galilean satellites.
Attributes: Science Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course
Note: Other hours include supervised evening observing sessions.
Delivery: Lethbridge Campus

Credit Hours: 3.00
The science of human nutrition based on some elementary principles of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Nutritional requirements, the function and metabolism of nutrients and the practical means for achieving adequate nutrition are emphasized. The relationship among social and economic issues, nutrition, food production and distribution will be discussed.
Attributes: Science Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course
Delivery: Lethbridge Campus

Credit Hours: 3.00
Exposure to the biology behind commonly reported topics in the media with the goal of increasing biological literacy. Students will be prepared to make better informed decisions about the biology that impacts daily life.
Attributes: Science Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course
Delivery: Lethbridge Campus

Credit Hours: 3.00
Introduction to problem-solving and algorithms. Machine representation of data. Implementation of algorithms in a programming language. Fundamentals of programming concepts including branching and loops. Top-down programming and modular design. Arrays. Records. Techniques for constructing elegant and robust programs.
Attributes: Science Lib Ed Req, Introductory Course(0500-1999), Arts & Science or LBED course
Note: This course includes a lab and a tutorial.
Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.00
Introduction to object-oriented programming techniques: classes, objects, and methods. Generic programming. Recursion. Abstract data types: lists, stacks, queues, priority queues, binary trees. Algorithms for searching and sorting, and algorithm analysis.
Prerequisite(s): Computer Science 1620 AND One of Computer Science 1820 or Mathematics 1410
Course Attributes: Science Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course
Delivery: Lethbridge Campus

Credit Hours: 3.00

This is the first of two 40-hour workshops designed for people looking to break into the field of Data Science. If you would like to develop machine learning skills that can be applied to solve real-world problems, you will be very interested in this workshop.

Data Science has revolutionized decision-making in the information age. These days, government agencies, private companies, and research labs all need people with the skills to capture, visualize, and analyze data.

In Introduction to Data Science with Python 1, participants will learn a modern data science workflow so they can get to work answering questions with data. Specific skills include cleaning and managing data, exploring data with visualizations and clustering algorithms, building models to make predictions, and using data to communicate with non-specialists. We will do all this using Python, one of the leading programming languages for Data Science, and Colaboratory, a cloud-based platform for machine learning.

Prerequisite(s): Third-year standing (a minimum of 60.0 credit hours)
Recommended Background: Computer literacy and interest in Data Science
Equivalent: Statistics 4850 (Introduction to Data Science with Python) (prior to 2022/2023)
Attributes: Introduction to Data Science I, Science Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course

Delivery: Lethbridge Campus

Credit Hours: 3.00
The study of how prices and quantities are determined in the marketplace. Consumers' and firms' views of the various markets in which goods and services are bought and sold. Current everyday life examples of microeconomics, as well as the role of government in the Canadian free market system.
Attributes: Social Science Lib Ed Req, Introductory Course(0500-1999), Arts & Science or LBED course
Note: This course may be offered with a lab component.
Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.00
An introduction to the application of economic principles to organizations and how they operate. The neoclassical theory of the firm, team production, property rights, ownership and efficiency, contract theory, rent capture, agency problems and corporate control, managing human resources, core competencies and competitive strategies, organizational structure in a global environment. Case studies relate theoretical concepts to modern firms.
Attributes: Social Science Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course
Note: This course may be offered with a lab component.
Note: Two sections
Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.00
An introduction to the study of English language and literature, involving an exploration of various genres of literature and non-literary texts and requiring a series of critical assignments designed to encourage analytical reading, thinking and writing.
Attributes: Fine Arts & Humanit Lib Ed Req, Introductory Course(0500-1999), Arts & Science or LBED course
Delivery: Lethbridge Campus

Credit Hours: 3.00

This course focuses on creative writing in short prose forms. Students will read short stories, personal essays, and autofiction by contemporary writers. Students will practice writing in some—or all—of these forms. Every week, several students will submit portions of their creative works-in-progress for critique by their peers and professor. Over the course of the semester, students will learn techniques to refine the elements of narrative craft—developing voice, setting, character, plot, dialogue, and tension. 
Prerequisite(s): One of English 1900 or a previous course in English (3.0 credit hours) AND Second-year standing (a minimum of 30.0 credit hours) Note: This online course is delivered in real-time during the days and times indicated.
Attributes: Creative Writing - Short Prose, Fine Arts & Humanit Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course, English Subfield 1
Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.00
Introduction to the atmosphere. Global circulation and the role of energy exchange. Structure and behaviour of world and regional weather systems. Synoptic meteorology. Bioclimatology. Climate variation and cycles.
Prerequisites: One of Geography 1000, Environmental Science 2000, admission to the Post-Diploma B.Sc. in Agricultural Studies, admission to the Post-Diploma B.Sc. in Environmental Science, or admission to the Post-Diploma B.Sc. in Geography, with a Concentration in Geographical Information Science
Attributes: Science Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course
Delivery: Online
Note: This course includes a lab component.

Credit Hours: 3.00
This course examines the evolution of health and illness care in Canada over four centuries, with an emphasis on the 20th Century. It emphasizes the historical development of medicine, nursing, social work, pharmacy, and public health as interrelated yet distinct spheres of practice. It also looks at how particular historical events and movements (Spanish Flu epidemic, World Wars I and II, modern hospital movement) helped to shape how Canadians perceive and provide illness and health care.

Note: Students must register in the cross-listed section of the course HLSC 2450.

Prerequisite(s): One course (3.0 credit hours) in History, Nursing, or Health Sciences
Course Attributes: Fine Arts & Humanit Lib Ed Req, Health Sciences course, Arts & Science or LBED course

Delivery: Online

 

Credit Hours: 3.00
This course examines the development of Canadian nursing from its religious roots in 17th-Century Quebec to the modern hospital movement of the 20th Century. It emphasizes ways in which politics, gender, race and religion helped to shape nursing into a predominantly hospital-based profession comprised of white women, and looks at the efforts of men and minority women to earn a place in nursing in Canada and elsewhere.

Note: Students must register in the cross-listed section of the course HLSC 3560.

Prerequisite(s): One course (3.0 credit hours) in Health Sciences, Nursing, or History
Course Attributes: One Arts & Humanit Lib Ed Req, Health Sciences course, Arts & Science or LBED course

Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.00
This class examines the lived experience of gender and religion in Canadian history. Through topics, such as evangelicalism, the sexual revolution, Indigenous spirituality, and secularism, and with an emphasis on the twentieth century, students will consider the complex nature of the relationship between gender and religion, and the significance of those intersections to Canada as a whole. Through lectures, discussions, and analysis of primary sources, students will be encouraged to engage with perspectives other than their own while also improving their critical thinking and communication skills.  
Prerequisite(s): One course (3.0 credit hours) in History at the 1000 level AND One additional course (3.0 credit hours) in History
Attributes: Intersections of Gender & Rel, Fine Arts & Humanit Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course

Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.0
Be part of the inaugural Oral History Summer Institute at the Centre for Oral History & Tradition! In IDST 2850 students will learn about oral history methods and theories, workshop practical oral history skills, and hear from practising oral historians and esteemed guest speakers. Whether you are working on qn oral interview research project, or you’ve never conducted an interview before, the Summer Institute’s combination of instructional, workshop, and feedback sessions has something to offer students at a variety of levels and across disciplines. Learn more.

Note: Students must register in the cross-listed section of the course. Refer to cross-listed section for meeting time details.
Attributes: Oral History Summer Institute, Fine Arts & Humanit Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course
Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.00
Introduction to the Canadian Indigenous context through a focus on FNMI perspectives of space and place, contact, law, ethnogenesis, colonialism, segregation, integration, languages, aesthetics and diverse historical relations. Resistant interpretations of conventional wisdom with regards to FNMI/colonial relations. This course is especially targeted at students considering a career in any occupation in which they will be interacting with Indigenous peoples, while increasing general understanding of, and sensitivity toward, Canadian Indigenous perspectives.
Equivalent: Native American Studies 1000 (prior to 2019/2020)
Attributes: Fine Arts & Humanit Lib Ed Req, Introductory Course(0500-1999), Arts & Science or LBED course
Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.00
Other hours per term: 0-0-40 An in-depth examination of contemporary issues in Indigenous management. Learning occurs within the classroom and through the required study tour and/or site visits to various relevant on and off reserve locales to meet with experts and Indigenous leaders (trips may be to British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, or other provinces or countries depending on the term and series topic). Topics may include community economic development, resource development, environmental policies, treaty and government policies and relations, human resource management, Indigenous business models and development of various entrepreneurial enterprises. Students will have a unique opportunity to gain a greater understanding of cultural, business and economic aspects of Indigenous management and governance issues.

Note: Students must register in the cross-listed section of the course IGBM 3592

Prerequisite(s): Successful application to Applied Indigenous Management Issues (Series) course AND Third-year standing (a minimum of 60.0 credit hours) AND One of Indigenous Governance and Business Management 2500 or Indigenous Studies 1000
Equivalent: Management 3592 (prior to 2021/2022)

Note: Apply online at: www.ulethbridge.ca/dhillon/mgt3592

Course Attributes: Management course, Arts & Science or LBED course

Delivery: Lethbridge Campus

Credit Hours: 3.00

Broad exploration of individual and group identities, key concepts in a liberal education; multidisciplinary and integrative perspective; examples from the Sciences, Social Sciences, Humanities, and Fine Arts. Discussion groups and labs teach higher level critical thinking, communication, and research skills.

Prerequisite(s): One of Liberal Education 1000 or four courses (12.0 credit hours) in Arts and Science

Note: Students who complete both Liberal Education 1000 and Liberal Education 2000 may reduce the Liberal Education List Requirement by one course from each of the three lists. Liberal Education 2000 alone does not fulfill any list requirement.
Course Attributes: Arts & Science or LBED course

Delivery: Lethbridge Campus

Credit Hours: 3.00
Introductory course in spoken and written German for students with little or no knowledge of the language: Use your newly acquired language skills in class and discover interesting cultural aspects.
Attributes: Fine Arts & Humanit Lib Ed Req, Introductory Course(0500-1999), Arts & Science or LBED course
Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.00

Lifelong health is determined by many factors including genes, experiences, and social environment. Experiences at sensitive periods of development change the brain in ways that increase or decrease risk for later physical and mental illness, including addiction. This course is based on the Core Story of Brain Development offered by the Alberta Family Wellness Initiative (AFWI) and includes significant Indigenous content presented by Indigenous scholars. It is designed for students from any discipline seeking a deeper understanding of early brain development and its consequences for lifelong health, executive function development, and recovery from trauma, and includes Indigenous perspectives on life-long health and recovery from trauma.

Note: Students must register in the cross-listed section of the course LBED 2300.

Equivalent: Neuroscience 1850/Liberal Education 1850 (The Core Story of Brain Development) (prior to 2022/2023); Neuroscience 2850/Liberal Education 2850 (The Core Story of Brain Development) (prior to 2022/2023)
Course Attributes: Science Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course

Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.00
In this course, we will critically consider several main theories concerning right and wrong action, good and bad states of affairs, and virtuous and vicious character.

Recommended Background: Philosophy 1000
Course Attributes: Fine Arts & Humanit Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course

Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.00
Introduction to social, physical, and cognitive development from infancy to late childhood, and the major theoretical perspectives underlying research in each domain.

Prerequisite(s): One of Psychology 1020 or Psychology 1000 (prior to 2022/2023)
Course Attributes: Social Science Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course

Delivery: Lethbridge Campus

Credit Hours: 3.00

Students will build on their knowledge of developmental psychology and reconsider their understanding of the field’s goals. Although this course takes a specifically developmental perspective, we will discuss the goals shared with psychology more broadly (to describe, explain, and optimize), as well as what makes these goals distinctly developmental (i.e., applying these goals to the study of continuities and change over time). The course is divided into four sections: What is developmental psychology?; Historical origins of developmental psychology; Research methods in developmental psychology; and Critical developmental psychology. Overall, the aim of this course is to turn our attention to the assumed way of thinking and doing things in developmental psychology. The point of critique is not to criticize, but instead, to describe, reflect, and evaluate, with the ultimate aim of advancing an already successful and prolific field. This course takes a critical look at developmental psychology as an act of appreciation for an area of psychology that is foundational to the entire discipline and has implications for society more broadly. 

Prerequisite(s): Psychology 1000
Attributes: Developmental Psychology, Social Science Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course

Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.00

When admiring the cryptic smile of Mona Lisa1, we can’t help but think that this painting is the product of a creative mind. However, is creativity really a feature limited to enlightened geniuses, or can innovative and creative behavior be found more widely in human (and non-human) animals? And if so, is creative behavior expressed at the same frequency across people? Overall, the goal of this course is to understand how and why humans and nonhuman animals express creative and innovative behavior. By the end of this course, students will be familiar with the theoretical and empirical literature regarding innovation and creativity. Most of the course will investigate the proximate underpinnings of creativity and innovation, such as the psychological (cognitive and non-cognitive) factors underlying creative behavior, and the neurobiological and developmental basis of innovative and creative thinking. The second part of the course will focus on how environmental and social influences, together with contextual and cultural differences, are responsible for variation in creative expression. In the last section, the course will cover ultimate levels of explanations of innovation and creativity, that is evolutionary theories and (non-)adaptive views on innovation and creativity research. To do so, the course will adopt a cross-species comparative approach to understanding the ecological, cognitive and evolutionary traits that differentiate innovative and creative behavior in humans and non-human animals.

Prerequisite(s): Psychology 2330 AND One of Psychology 2030, Sociology 2130, Statistics 1770, or Psychology 3450/Health Sciences 3450
Attributes: Creativity and Innovation, Science Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course

Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.00

In this course we examine the history and development of religion, particularly Christianity in North America from the 17th to the 20th century. The main focus is on groups belonging to, or having ties to the Adventist, the Latter Day Saint, Holiness-Pentecostal and the Bible Student-Jehovah’s Witness movements. These “American originals” are historically among the most recent additions to Christianity and represent as a block the largest non-Catholic churches in the world. Central themes and characteristics held in common by North American religious groups such as millenarianism, evangelicalism, and Utopianism, as well their interaction with American cultural and political institutions are examined.

Prerequisite(s): One of Religious Studies 1000 or seven courses (21.0 credit hours) in Arts and Science (Additional prerequisites may be specified, including any recommended background, for individual offerings)
Equivalent: Any offering in the Religious Studies 3000 Series with the same title as the offering in the Religious Studies 3501 Series
Course Attributes: Fine Arts & Humanit Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course
Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.00

The movement, more commonly known as Mormonism, is one of North America’s largest indigenous religious groups. The churches, to varying degrees, base their beliefs on the teachings of Joseph Smith Jr. The most well known church within the movement is the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, or LDS church. The course examines the history and the development of the Latter Day Saint churches from their origin as a millenarian sect in 1830’s New York to the present day with a focus on what makes the movement distinct in the areas of the divine, social relations, politics, and economics.

Prerequisite(s): One of Religious Studies 1000 or seven courses (21.0 credit hours) in Arts and Science (Additional prerequisites may be specified, including any recommended background, for individual offerings)
Equivalent: Any offering in the Religious Studies 3000 Series with the same title as the offering in the Religious Studies 3501 Series
Course Attributes:  Fine Arts & Humanit Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course

Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.00

India is home to some of the most ancient and fascinating mythological storytelling on the planet. This course looks to stories of gods, goddesses, heroes, sages and kings to shed light on both ancient India and on the human experience. We will explore these tales through both textual accounts and through live storytelling. Special attention will be paid to myths related to yoga poses.

Prerequisite(s): Religious Studies 1000
Attributes: Myths of India, Fine Arts & Humanit Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course

Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.00
Normative processes by which deviance is constructed with a particular focus on power as both implicated in, and the outcome of, these processes.
Prerequisite(s): One of Sociology 1000 or a previous course (3.0 credit hours) in Sociology
Attributes: Social Science Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course
Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.00

From an Indigenous perspective, this course provides a survey of historical and contemporary issues and experiences related to Indigenous Peoples within a Canadian context. The course will focus on social inequities such as: production of race, cultural identity formation, federal law and legislation, Indigenous political activism, intergenerational trauma, education, and decolonization. Through an Indigenous lens and using Indigenous theories the course will deconstruct these social inequities from the examination of social structures and social processes that have led to socio-political challenges in Indigenous communities. 

Prerequisite(s): One of Sociology 1000 or Indigenous 1000 Note: This online course is delivered in real-time during the days and times indicated.
Attributes: Indigenous Issues in Canada, Social Science Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course

Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.00
This course is designed to develop skills in critical reading and writing at the university level. The course includes the critical reading of assigned texts and an introduction to expository writing, including description, analysis, persuasion and other strategies of academic discourse. Special attention will be paid throughout to conventions of English usage. Mutually Exclusive: Writing 1200
Attributes: Fine Arts & Humanit Lib Ed Req, Introductory Course(0500-1999), Arts & Science or LBED course, Nursing English Composition
Note: This course is delivered online and has no specific days or times scheduled. Students will self-manage learning the course content provided by the instructor.

Summer Session II (July)

Credit Hours: 3.00

Attributes: Biotechnology Basics, Science Lib Ed Req, Introductory Course(0500-1999), Arts & Science or LBED course

Delivery: Lethbridge Campus

Credit Hours: 3.00
The application of statistical techniques to economic and business data, with emphasis on statistical estimation, hypothesis testing, regression, correlation, time series analysis and index numbers.
Prerequisite(s): Statistics 1770 AND One of Economics 1010 or Economics 1012 Mutually Exclusive: Statistics 2780
Substantially Similar: Statistics 2780
Attributes: Science Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course
Note: This course may be offered with a lab component.
Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.00
An examination of theories and concepts in politics and/or international relations through their portrayal in works of popular culture including movies, television, works of literature, and other media.

Equivalent: Political Science 3850 (Film and International Relations) (prior to 2018/2019) is equivalent to the same offering in the Political Science 3750 Series; Political Science 3850 (The International Relations of Middle Earth: Lessons from Lord of the Rings) (prior to 2018/2019) is equivalent to the same offering in the Political Science 3750 Series
Course Attributes: Arts & Science or LBED course

Delivery: Lethbridge Campus

Summer Session II/III (July-August)

Credit Hours: 3.00

This is the second of two 40-hour workshops designed for people looking to break into the field of Data Science. If you would like to develop machine learning skills that can be applied to solve real-world problems, you will be very interested in this workshop. To take this second workshop, we recommend you take the first workshop, or already have some background with python.

Data Science has revolutionized decision-making in the information age. These days, government agencies, private companies, and research labs all need people with the skills to capture, visualize, and analyze data.

In Introduction to Data Science with Python 2, participants will be introduced to deep learning algorithms. Specific skills include learning when deep learning algorithms are likely to be most useful, how to build your own models, how to use models built by others, and how to work with image and text data. We will do all this using Python, one of the leading programming languages for Data Science, and Colaboratory, a cloud-based platform for machine learning.

Prerequisite(s): Third-year standing (a minimum of 60.0 credit hours)
Recommended Background: Computer literacy and an interest in data science
Delivery: Lethbridge Campus

Credit Hours: 3.00
The study of the current Canadian economy, including the roles of the Federal Government and the Bank of Canada. Canada's output, unemployment, inflation, money, interest rates, investment, consumption, and trade relationships in the economy. Canada's role in the world economy.
Attributes: Social Science Lib Ed Req, Introductory Course(0500-1999), Arts & Science or LBED course
Note: This course may be offered with a lab component.
Delivery: Calgary Campus

Credit Hours: 3.00
Physical environments, resources, economics and settlements of the regions of Canada.
Course Attributes: Social Science Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course

Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.00
HIST2850 examines the history of Indigenous peoples in North America from 1763 to the present, with a focus on Indigenous and ethnohistorical perspectives. Topics will include, among others, military encounters, expansion and removals, treaties, resource use, and gender relations.
Prerequisite(s): One course (3.0 credit hours) in History at the 1000 level Note: This online course is delivered in real-time during the days and times indicated.
Attributes: Indg. Peoples N. America 1763, Fine Arts & Humanit Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course
Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.00

Introduction to the Canadian Indigenous context through a focus on FNMI perspectives of space and place, contact, law, ethnogenesis, colonialism, segregation, integration, languages, aesthetics and diverse historical relations. Resistant interpretations of conventional wisdom with regards to FNMI/colonial relations. This course is especially targeted at students considering a career in any occupation in which they will be interacting with Indigenous peoples, while increasing general understanding of, and sensitivity toward, Canadian Indigenous perspectives.
Equivalent: Native American Studies 1000 (prior to 2019/2020)
Attributes: Fine Arts & Humanit Lib Ed Req, Introductory Course(0500-1999), Arts & Science or LBED course

Note: This course is delivered online and has no specific days or times scheduled. Students will self-manage learning the course content provided by the instructor.

Credit Hours: 3.00
Topics covered in this course include: linear systems; vectors and matrices; determinants; orthogonality and applications; vector geometry; eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and applications; and complex numbers.
Attributes: Science Lib Ed Req, Introductory Course(0500-1999), Arts & Science or LBED course

Credit Hours: 3.00

This course will cover the following topics: functions; limits; continuity; differentiation and integration of polynomial, rational, root, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions; inverse functions, including inverse trigonometric functions; applications of derivatives, including linear approximations and Taylor polynomials; curve sketching, optimization, and related rates; anti-derivatives; definite integrals and Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; and change of variables.

Attributes: Science Lib Ed Req, Introductory Course(0500-1999), Arts & Science or LBED course

Credit Hours: 3.00
This course is an introductory course designed for the students with very little or no knowledge of Russian language and culture. The course is designed to be interactive and engaging. This course will provide students with basic language skills so that they can talk about themselves to others at the introductory level.  Students will gain some cultural perspective along the way as well.
Attributes: Intro to Russian Lang & Cultur, Fine Arts & Humanit Lib Ed Req, Introductory Course(0500-1999), Arts & Science or LBED course
Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.00

“What is the meaning of life?” is one of the oldest and most profound philosophical questions. In this course we will critically consider a number of potential responses one may adopt to this question. We will begin by examining theistic answers to the question, which hold that religion gives our lives meaning. We will then consider some criticisms of the theistic view and survey various topics and alternative answers including death, the afterlife, pessimism, absurdity, subjectivity, pluralism, and objectivity.

Recommended Background: Philosophy 1000
Attributes: Fine Arts & Humanit Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course
Delivery: Online

Note: This course is delivered online and has no specific days or times scheduled. Students will self-manage learning the course content provided by the instructor.

Credit Hours: 3.00
This course considers contemporary political humour in the Canadian and American contexts, focusing on questions such as: can citizens be entertained and informed at the same time? Is news parody real journalism? Does political humour speak truth to power? Or does it reproduce existing power structures based on gender, race, class, and colonialism? How do citizens and social movements use humour as a form of resistance?
Note: This online course is delivered in real-time during the days and times indicated.
Attributes: Political Humour: Power & Res., Arts & Science or LBED course

Credit Hours: 3.00

Conservation Psychology is an interdisciplinary and applied field that aims to use psychological principles, theories, and methods to understand how people think about, experience, and interact with nature, with the goal of solving societal and ethical issues regarding the environment, promoting environmental sustainability, and fostering human well-being. By the end of the course, students should be able to comprehend how and why Psychology is relevant to furthering biodiversity conservation and a more sustainable relationship between humans and the rest of the natural world. Among other objectives, they will understand how attitudes, values, and perceptions influence human behaviour regarding the natural environment.

Prerequisite(s): Psychology 2330
Attributes: Conservation Psychology, Social Science Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course

Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.00
An introduction to sociological perspectives on gender, focusing on the social construction of gendered bodies, subjectivities, desires, sexuality through social interaction, and institutions. Comparative and historical perspectives on gender as foundational to operations of power in western societies.

Prerequisite(s): One of Sociology 1000 or a previous course (3.0 credit hours) in Sociology
Course Attributes: Social Science Lib Ed Req, Arts & Science or LBED course

Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.00
Descriptive statistics and graphical representation. Measure of central tendency and dispersion. Elementary probability. Discrete and continuous random variables. Expectation. Binomial, normal and Student's t-distribution. Large and small sample inference and estimation. Central Limit Theorem.
Prerequisite(s): One of Mathematics 30-1, Mathematics 30-2, Pure Mathematics 30, Mathematics 0500, Mathematics 0520, admission to the Post-Diploma B.A. in Agricultural Studies, admission to the Post-Diploma B.Sc. in Agricultural Studies, or admission to the B.Sc. in Environmental Science
Attributes: Science Lib Ed Req, Introductory Course(0500-1999), Arts & Science or LBED course
Delivery: Online

Note: This course is delivered online and has no specific days or times scheduled. Students will self-manage learning the course content provided by the instructor.

Credit Hours: 3.00

Concerns of women in health and illness are explored in relation to current formal and informal health care practices.

Note: Students must register in the cross-listed section of the course HLSC 2600.

Prerequisite(s): Second-year standing (a minimum of 30.0 credit hours)
Course Attributes: Social Science Lib Ed Req, Health Sciences course, Arts & Science or LBED course

Delivery: Online

Credit Hours: 3.00
Using a genre-based, writing-across-the-curriculum approach, this course addresses the range of skills that students need to be successful academic readers and writers across the disciplines in the modern research university. This includes practice related to the techniques of summary, citation, analysis, synthesis, academic argumentation, revision, scholarly research, and academic writing conventions. Mutually Exclusive: Writing 1200
Substantially Similar: Writing 1200; Writing 1850 (Writing for Engineering Students) (prior to 2019/2020)
Course Attributes: Fine Arts & Humanit Lib Ed Req, Introductory Course(0500-1999), Arts & Science or LBED course, Nursing English Composition
Delivery: Online